Let’s talk about love

Love.

I’m not talking about the Hallmark stuff. I will not be running out to buy a card which would sit on the table or mantle for a week and then get environmentally put in the recycling bin. My family knows I’m not the card type.

Love is in the small things you do everyday. Love is not February 14th. Love is getting out of bed early on your day off and making coffee and breakfast without hesitation. Love is putting the lid down on the toilet. (this also ends the seat up/seat down debate once and for all)  Love is rubbing someone’s feet or shoulders after a long day at work. Love is filling up the gas tank. Love is making someone’s favourite meal and doing the clean up. Love is a walk. Love is silence. Love is giving away the last cookie. Love is understanding and supporting those around us daily. Love is a journey. Love changes along the way. Love can be for a pet. Love can be for a sibling. Love can be for a significant other. Love can be for a child. Love can be for a parent. Love is vital for yourself. Love overlooks the little things. Love understands we are all different. Love supports the honest endeavours of those around us, even if those trials don’t align with our own views. Love doesn’t mock or belittle. Love embraces and nourishes. Love teaches. Love crosses time and space. Love is global. Love isn’t a card.

Love yourself. Love your family. Love your home. Love your environment, your planet.

Love yourself. Feed yourself well. Good, healthy food. Real food, things you can pronounce. If it has more than four syllables and isn’t cauliflower or romanesco, you probably should skip it. If it was created in a factory, again, you probably should give it a wide berth. The best stuff to nourish and love your precious body with should be recognizable in it’s natural form. Don’t eat “food-like” products. Love yourself better than that. Don’t smoke. Really, don’t do it. Feed your brain. Read. Read for fun. Read to learn. Learn something new everyday. This helps you grow. Laugh. Smile, it’s good for your heart and soul. Rest. Protect your quiet time. Practice deep breathing. Sleep in a dark room. Take time to your own thoughts. Move daily, be it a walk, 8 kilometres on your treadmill, kickboxing, dance lessons or tai chi. Don’t lose sight of your own importance.

Love your family. Put down your phone. Turn off the screens. Put a timer on the router to turn the internet off while you sleep. (no more kids up all night glued to devices.) Read together. Be together. Go out together. Create memories. Too quickly, we get older and our lives take us places other than where we want to be. Talk. More importantly, listen. You’ll be amazed at what you can learn from others. Eat at the table. Be the one to offer to pick them up late at night. You’ll sleep better knowing they are safe. Bake with little ones. Give children and teenagers basic cooking lessons so they aren’t condemned to a life of eating Ichiban-style noodles and macaroni and cheese when they move out of the house. Embrace the mistakes and revel in the successes. Plan meals. Everyone makes one meal suggestion. Have dinner for breakfast. That age old question of “what’s for dinner?” will become a thing of the past. Plan, prep and portion your meals on your day(s) off. If you do this, when you get home from work during the week, you just pull out your prepped meals and heat them up. That extra time can be spent doing something important, like reading with a child, walking the dog or meditating. Planning your meals also cuts down on wasted food. You plan your meals, you shop for what you need, (fewer impulse purchases of the warehouse sized jar of pickled banana peppers ’cause you were hungry), and you use what you buy. Get the whole family involved in the planning and prep stages. Shopping online also makes it easy for everyone to help shop without having a meltdown in the cookie and sugar-coated cereal aisles.e5fa0-honest_labels_600

Love your home. Open the doors. Get fresh air inside your home. Declutter. Do you really need that nic-nac? Probably not. Make your purchases count. Invest in real furniture and basic pieces. It will last longer, look better and likely won’t end up in the landfill in two years when the leg breaks or the “wood-like” paper finish peels. Stick with simplicity and your furnishings won’t be out of style. Take pride in your home. Have pictures that make you smile. This is your castle, your sanctuary, be it a 4,000 square foot mansion or a mobile home on a rented trailer pad. Pick up any garbage that blows on your yard. Have pride in your home. Once you close the front door, this is your safe place. Your haven. Keep it clean and keep it safe.

Love your environment. Love your planet. Reduce. Reuse. Recycle. Take your shopping bags with you to the store. Take your reusable mug to Starbuck’s, David’s Tea or Timmy’s or wherever you get your caffeine fix. Think twice about fast food. Think about the garbage generated from that convenient meal. (remember when McDonald’s had styrofoam containers for their burgers? We’ve come a long way, but the road stretches out far ahead of us.) Pack a lunch in reusable containers. Buy local. A local farmer or artisan feels the impact of your dollar more than the big chain stores. Your purchase can be a difference in his or her livelihood. Your dollars stay closer to home in your community. Buying local allows the farmers and artisans you support, to employ other workers, which in turn reinvests those dollars back into the community. Staying local also can reduce the global shipping of consumer goods. We all know this is better for the environment. Know where your purchases originate from. If you can, choose Canadian made goods. Let’s cut down on as many imports as we can. Turn out the lights when you leave the room. Turn the heat down when you go out or go to bed. Put a timer on the furnace. This helps keep the dollars in your pocket. If you need to use the dryer, use dryer balls instead of liquid fabric softener. They are less expensive, and there are fewer chemicals going down the drain. Sunny day? Put the clothes on the line to dry. Let Mother Nature help with the laundry. Plant flowers that attract bees and butterflies. Don’t use pesticides. Embrace the odd weed in your yard. Grow some vegetables, fruit or herbs if you can. Chilly? Put on a sweater or cuddle up under a blanket. Blankets are far cozier when shared with someone.  Mend your socks. Use your buying power to state that you want local and sustainable goods. Catch and release spiders and flies who accidentally find their way in your home. They too have important jobs outside in this big world. It’s all about love. Love is, indeed, a many splendored thing.

Love.

Maybe The Beatles were right.

All you need is love.



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